Asia-Pacific

The US needs TPP as much as TPP needs the US

Abandoning TPP by the US, which seems increasingly likely after the victory of Donald Trump in the US presidential elections in November, will be a huge blow to American economic interests abroad and a golden opportunity for China to wield greater influence in the Asia-Pacific. President-elect Trump needs to rethink his campaign promises and embrace a more liberal foreign economic policy agenda both for the sake of America and the world. View
 

Enhancing NATO Cohesion: A Framework for 21st Century Solidarity

Memo 52: A diverse set of policies is needed to unify a diverse set of peoples against a diverse set of threats. NATO should reorganize itself, develop a shared clean-energy grid and strengthen links between different national publics. View
 

China vs US or China vs Law: How Europe Can Make the Difference

Terrorism, a belligerent Russia, and the refugee crisis are no excuses for Europe forgetting its international duties, like the preservation of the rules-based world order. The EU must affirm its commitment to international law by supporting the Permanent Court of Arbitration's ruling that China has no claim to expanded control of the South China Sea. The EU and the international community can show that this conflict is not China vs USA, but China vs international law. View
 

Future-Proofing NATO: A Forthcoming Decade of Change

Memo 50: NATO must adopt hybrid models of national defense, coordinate efforts on economic and electronic warfare, and secure its space-based infrastructure. The Alliance should also establish a partnership with China and strengthen its presence in the Arctic. View
 

A Holistic Approach to Defeating the Islamic State

NATO and its allies are insufficiently addressing the Islamic State, which will significantly backlash in the next 10 years. In order to sufficiently tackle this huge threat, we need a more comprehensive approach that addresses not only the Islamic State, in Iraq and Syria, but worldwide. The key to a successful strategy lies in a holistic two-fold approach – using special forces and the establishment of non-democratic governments. View
 

Shaping our NATO: Young Voices on the Warsaw Summit 2016

Our new policy workshop competition gives students and recent graduates the opportunity to reflect on the most pressing issues facing NATO today and to shape the future of the Alliance. Five winners will receive a trip to Berlin to present the collective ideas to decision-makers. View
 

The Implications of TPP for TTIP

Given the discriminative nature of the TPP on non-participants, the signing of the agreement on February 4, 2016 will augment pressure on the EU to accelerate their own path to finalizing a transatlantic trade deal. Notwithstanding the strong opposition to the TTIP, negotiations are poised to produce an ambitious deal in line with US preferences and allow the EU to consolidate its leading position within global markets thereby reducing the potential pernicious effects of TPP. View
 

The Munich Consensus and the Purpose of German Power

The Munich consensus has not radically transformed German foreign policy, but it has started an evolution. Germany is showing signs of strategic leadership in the international sphere. It must now reflect carefully about the preconditions for its economic wealth and act to reform the liberal international order in such a way that this liberal order can be sustained without disruption by major-power conflict. View
 

Political Risks Threaten the Global Economy

Political risks have increased in recent years, while policy makers, including central banks, have less power to mitigate those risks. Global stock prices, however, do not reflect these developments as the markets have been distracted by cheap and abundant liquidity. "Great Power Sclerosis" and the weakness of Pax Americana have created a vacuum in global governance. The bank Citi raises awareness about the "new convergence between geopolitical and vox populi risks". View
 

TPP Completed, on to TTIP?

The new TPP and TTIP agreements are the greatest deepening OECD has ever seen. True, they deepen it in two halves, one Atlantic, one Pacific; this is because some of the socio-cultural issues are different, and it enables the inclusion of several non-OECD allies from the diverse Pacific region, laying grounds for a further OECD widening when some of these countries become socioeconomically ripe. The two agreements could nevertheless be fruitfully linked later on. View