Topic of the Month: The Future of Health Care

This August, we will be dealing with the topic of Digitalization and the Future of Health. While the debate around the future of health care has been highly politicized, we would like to look beyond the discussions on Capitol Hill and examine the future of health, as the digitalization of health and medicine promise to change health care as we know it View.

Atlantic Expedition: Modernizing Transatlantic Relations

The Atlantic Expedition, a German-American fellowship program, aims to empower a younger and more diverse generation of leaders in transatlantic relations. Throughout the program, participants from both sides of the Atlantic discuss and implement creative and innovative ideas on how to modernize transatlantic relations. View.

NATO's Biggest Mistake and Lessons Learned

As part of the "Shaping Our NATO: Young Voices on the Warsaw Summit 2016" competition, 30 students and recent graduates from 13 countries wrote about NATO's mistakes, and how the Alliance can learn from them. Read their thoughts on the Kosovo intervention, NATO's decision not offer Russia membership, and NATO's public relations "failure" here. View

Preparing for NATO 2026

Read about the Battle for Tallinngrad, eco-friendly armies, hybrid warfare, NATO's midlife crisis, trouble in the Arctic, terrorism, the Alliance's preparedness to deal with threats from Space, and more.
These are the ideas 34 students and recent graduates from 12 countries developed to help NATO prepare effectively for 2026. View

 

 

TTIP Criticisms: Based on Myths or Reality?

TTIP Forum: The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership is the most ambitious project of transatlantic cooperation today. While proponents highlight the benefits, certain features are increasingly under public scrutiny, threatening the finalization of the deal. Atlantic Community brings both sides together to host a critical debate on the merits of their respective claims. View

Have ideas on foreign policy? Write a 500-700 word op-ed, offering your own policy recommendations on an issue important to the transatlantic community!
The best policy ideas go into our memo workshop, where Atlantic Community members debate the issues and look for consensus.
Recommendations that are supported by Atlantic Community members get collected into Atlantic Memos, our policy papers which we present to decision makers.
The Atlantic Community editorial team works to get our Memos in the hands of top policymakers, who periodically offer their feedback on atlantic-community.org.
By crowdsourcing the best ideas from our members and getting their voices heard by influential players in Europe and North America, Atlantic Community is helping to shape the debate and future policy.

The Lesson From Lithuania

Balance of power is a fairly straightforward dynamic within the Russia-NATO relationship but "balance of passion" seems to be an overlooked, but very crucial ingredient within long term confrontations. Lithuania is demonstrating to its NATO allies how to be more cohesive and unified than Russia both in message and purpose. Its citizens are preparing to confront invaders armed only with small arms, knowledge of their surroundings and a huge dose of patriotism. View
 

NATO Should be Worried About the United Kingdom

The United Kingdom has long been at the forefront of the NATO alliance as one of the strongest military powers with a highly capable military, second only to that of the United States. This will slowly come to an end over the next decade with the erosion in the military capability of UK armed forces, the lack of a grand strategy emanating from London and the diminishing importance in the special relationship between London and Washington. NATO should be prepared for a less capable full spectrum UK military. View
 

Germany Needs to Address Fake News and Digital Illiteracy

If hacking, espionage, cyber-attack and identity theft are to be considered existential threats in the cyber world, then ‘fake news or digital lying' can be considered emerging threats. As the Bundestag approaches the 2017 election, protection from fake news and increasing digital literacy are the needs of the hour, especially as first generation internet users have rebooted to ‘App-generation internet user'. Public-private partnerships are key for balancing security, privacy and free enterprise. View
 

Remedies Against Populism

Democracy is not “the rule of the people” and not even “the rule of majority”. It is a compromise between four principles: the will of the people, the wisdom of the elected, respect for rules and social commitment. The second principle is under attack by populists and needs protection as democracy should be strictly representative. How can we gain a balance between the necessary distrust and the equally necessary confidence towards politicians? View
 

Sharing, Gigs, On-Demand: Opportunities and Risks of the New Digital Economy

The old classifications of employed or self-employed seem not to fit in the new growing digital economy. If we do not address the role of the employers, the status of the workforce and the status of wage-dependent work in general, inequality in Europe and the US could become more pronounced. Digital labor might become a strain on the welfare system as well, when young digital workers do not contribute to the social security and health care systems. View
 

The UK Cannot Afford Capability and Contribution Gaps to NATO Post-Brexit

Post-Brexit and at a time of precarious power dynamics the UK cannot afford to have significant capability gaps which would harm the credibility and image of the UK as a significant global contender. The UK government has an obligation to fulfill its part towards collective security and defence for the NATO alliance. What you do wrong is far more often remembered than what you do right. Britain must remain vigilant. View
 

The US needs TPP as much as TPP needs the US

Abandoning TPP by the US, which seems increasingly likely after the victory of Donald Trump in the US presidential elections in November, will be a huge blow to American economic interests abroad and a golden opportunity for China to wield greater influence in the Asia-Pacific. President-elect Trump needs to rethink his campaign promises and embrace a more liberal foreign economic policy agenda both for the sake of America and the world. View
 

Trump and NATO: Opportunities and Dangers

The Atlantic world is not coming to an end. Not yet, at least. It is facing turbulence, which means serious risks. Change always brings both opportunity and risk. The best way to head off risk is, in most cases, to find and focus on opportunities. On the evidence thus far, the risks from Trump are less, not greater, than they have been from Obama and Bush II. The latter two were very different, but both were bad for the Atlantic Alliance. View
 

Defense of the West: NATO, the European Union and the Transatlantic Bargain

NATO now faces what could be the most profound threat in its history – a threat with roots inside the alliance and linked to challenges from outside. I hope that President Trump will reaffirm the values of "democracy, individual liberty and the rule of law" articulated in the North Atlantic Treaty and will disavow previous statements that the US commitment to collective defense is contingent on specific defense efforts by individual allies. View
 

Jeremy Corbyn: An Underrated Threat to NATO

The United Kingdom’s two main political parties, the ruling Conservative Party and the opposition Labour Party, have been seized by isolationist doctrine in the past year. The UK’s decision to leave the EU and its dangerous consequences have been extensively documented. Underrated, however, is the threat posed by Jeremy Corbyn, the far-left leader of the Labour Party, to the UK’s status within the transatlantic community – namely NATO. View
 

Enhanced EU Defense Cooperation: Good News for NATO?

Despite recent commitments, it is unlikely that many NATO members will reach the 2% target on defense spending by 2024. While some seek to project their power globally, others are comfortable in their role of regional powers, or suffering from sluggish economies. Thus, the potential of Europe as an agent in international security remains largely untapped. Enhanced defense cooperation at EU-level might encourage better engagement with international security by some EU powers. View
 

Corbyn and Trump: Two Sides of the Same Anti-NATO Coin

Though seemingly worlds apart in their political leanings, Jeremy Corbyn, the leader of the UK's Labour Party, and Donald Trump, the divisive Republican residential candidate, share common ground in being critical of NATO – though for quite different reasons. Even if neither appears likely to make executive office, the sentiment which they represent and the movements which they have stewarded will continue to thrive while NATO's mainstream politicians fail to make the positive case for the Alliance. View
 

Atlantic Expedition: Modernizing Transatlantic Relations

The Atlantische Initiative is proud to announce the new fellowship and exchange program Atlantic Expedition to empower a young and diverse group of future US and German leaders. Fellows will collaborate to write policy memos to modernize transatlantic relations, and will travel to the US and Germany together. Apply today! View
 

Improving Participation in the NATO Defense Planning Process

Memo 53: The North Atlantic Council needs an advisory voting system and more transparency. Regional interest blocs and enhancing the status of civil-military cooperation would incentivize more active participation in the NATO Defense Planning Process. View
 

The EU Must Become a Crisis Management Leader

The EU's Common Security and Defense Policy (CSDP) has not risen to recent challenges, in Libya in particular. The EU should institutionalize a more responsive structure that will ensure rapid military response where and when necessary. Such a structure will also be depended upon for securing European borders while concurrently preventing EU member states from responding to crises as a European pillar of NATO. View
 

Enhancing NATO Cohesion: A Framework for 21st Century Solidarity

Memo 52: A diverse set of policies is needed to unify a diverse set of peoples against a diverse set of threats. NATO should reorganize itself, develop a shared clean-energy grid and strengthen links between different national publics. View
 

China vs US or China vs Law: How Europe Can Make the Difference

Terrorism, a belligerent Russia, and the refugee crisis are no excuses for Europe forgetting its international duties, like the preservation of the rules-based world order. The EU must affirm its commitment to international law by supporting the Permanent Court of Arbitration's ruling that China has no claim to expanded control of the South China Sea. The EU and the international community can show that this conflict is not China vs USA, but China vs international law. View
 

Redefining Relationships Inside and Outside the Alliance

Memo 51: In order to learn from past mistakes, NATO should seek to bring Russia into the fold of European security, refrain from humanitarian missions better conducted under UN auspices, sanction non-compliance to the 2% defense spending promise, and strengthen its democratic norms. View
 

Georgia and Russia: Smoldering Conflict at a Geopolitical Intersection

Georgia can be a strategic pillar of stability in an otherwise volatile region and we should consequently place it much higher on our political agenda. Georgians want nothing more than NATO membership and the West cannot deny the evident successes of democratization and economic reform. The internal logic of realist politics however demands other factors also be considered. Georgia joining NATO would further exacerbate the conflict with Russia. View
 

Future-Proofing NATO: A Forthcoming Decade of Change

Memo 50: NATO must adopt hybrid models of national defense, coordinate efforts on economic and electronic warfare, and secure its space-based infrastructure. The Alliance should also establish a partnership with China and strengthen its presence in the Arctic. View
 

NATO Energy Security Strategy Crucial to Checking Russian Aggression

Russian gas supplies are dividing Europe on sanctions. Recognition of the security implications of climate change are becoming widely recognized. NATO can and should play a key role in driving positive on both by building energy security for its members. Including specific, targeted mandates to enable mutual energy security in NATO’s mission moving forward would be to both recognize the key challenges of our time and bolster longstanding alliance precepts. View
 

Making NATO More Institutionalized

NATO can only improve the cohesion and strengthen consensus among the member countries if the right tools and framework are introduced. Member nations will not voluntarily focus on the common good of NATO. They need to be persuaded by initiatives and measures that serve their other national interests. It is thereby important to create an independent NATO body or institution that can make some recommendations for the political agenda and reward member nations. View
 

Making NATO More Popular for Everyone

To increase empathy and solidarity between the publics of NATO member countries, the organization must start with the education of their citizens and promotion of the Alliance’s. The general knowledge of ordinary people in society needs to be increased by incorporating more information about NATO related activities into their daily lives. Providing this information only to interested people or narrowly focused university students is not enough. View
 

NATO Needs to Make Itself Heard

NATO's strength is based on the cooperation and support of many nations. Member nations however seem to be less willing to protect one another as diverging threat perceptions arise. NATO must begin creating ways for member citizens to interact and associate thereby increasing unity and cohesion in the face of future challenges. View
 

To Enhance Cohesion, NATO Should Change Its Name

As former Soviet states joined the Alliance, a problem of unity emerged for conceptions of order and military thinking differed. Today, NATO is facing increasing pressure to cope with multiple challenges. A lack of cohesion may have disastrous consequences for world peace. What I therefore proposed is not concerned with the internal structure of the alliance. Instead, I recommend changing NATO’s name as a way of enhancing cohesion through meaning. View
 

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