Trade, Economics & Finance

It's the State of our Democracy, Stupid! Why Transatlantic Relations are in Trouble

The transatlantic relationship is in trouble mainly because both the US and Germany struggle with domestic political problems. This is evident particularly in light of the current populism – more and more people do not feel represented any longer by political elites. In order to revitalize transatlantic relations, domestic homework needs to be done first. This is a summarized and updated version of a Key Note at the Harvard Council Forum, Soho-Haus Berlin, October 22, 2016. View
 

Remedies Against Populism

Democracy is not “the rule of the people” and not even “the rule of majority”. It is a compromise between four principles: the will of the people, the wisdom of the elected, respect for rules and social commitment. The second principle is under attack by populists and needs protection as democracy should be strictly representative. How can we gain a balance between the necessary distrust and the equally necessary confidence towards politicians? View
 

Sharing, Gigs, On-Demand: Opportunities and Risks of the New Digital Economy

The old classifications of employed or self-employed seem not to fit in the new growing digital economy. If we do not address the role of the employers, the status of the workforce and the status of wage-dependent work in general, inequality in Europe and the US could become more pronounced. Digital labor might become a strain on the welfare system as well, when young digital workers do not contribute to the social security and health care systems. View
 

The US needs TPP as much as TPP needs the US

Abandoning TPP by the US, which seems increasingly likely after the victory of Donald Trump in the US presidential elections in November, will be a huge blow to American economic interests abroad and a golden opportunity for China to wield greater influence in the Asia-Pacific. President-elect Trump needs to rethink his campaign promises and embrace a more liberal foreign economic policy agenda both for the sake of America and the world. View
 

Jeremy Corbyn: An Underrated Threat to NATO

The United Kingdom’s two main political parties, the ruling Conservative Party and the opposition Labour Party, have been seized by isolationist doctrine in the past year. The UK’s decision to leave the EU and its dangerous consequences have been extensively documented. Underrated, however, is the threat posed by Jeremy Corbyn, the far-left leader of the Labour Party, to the UK’s status within the transatlantic community – namely NATO. View
 

Corbyn and Trump: Two Sides of the Same Anti-NATO Coin

Though seemingly worlds apart in their political leanings, Jeremy Corbyn, the leader of the UK's Labour Party, and Donald Trump, the divisive Republican residential candidate, share common ground in being critical of NATO – though for quite different reasons. Even if neither appears likely to make executive office, the sentiment which they represent and the movements which they have stewarded will continue to thrive while NATO's mainstream politicians fail to make the positive case for the Alliance. View
 

Enhancing NATO Cohesion: A Framework for 21st Century Solidarity

Memo 52: A diverse set of policies is needed to unify a diverse set of peoples against a diverse set of threats. NATO should reorganize itself, develop a shared clean-energy grid and strengthen links between different national publics. View
 

China vs US or China vs Law: How Europe Can Make the Difference

Terrorism, a belligerent Russia, and the refugee crisis are no excuses for Europe forgetting its international duties, like the preservation of the rules-based world order. The EU must affirm its commitment to international law by supporting the Permanent Court of Arbitration's ruling that China has no claim to expanded control of the South China Sea. The EU and the international community can show that this conflict is not China vs USA, but China vs international law. View
 

Georgia and Russia: Smoldering Conflict at a Geopolitical Intersection

Georgia can be a strategic pillar of stability in an otherwise volatile region and we should consequently place it much higher on our political agenda. Georgians want nothing more than NATO membership and the West cannot deny the evident successes of democratization and economic reform. The internal logic of realist politics however demands other factors also be considered. Georgia joining NATO would further exacerbate the conflict with Russia. View
 

Future-Proofing NATO: A Forthcoming Decade of Change

Memo 50: NATO must adopt hybrid models of national defense, coordinate efforts on economic and electronic warfare, and secure its space-based infrastructure. The Alliance should also establish a partnership with China and strengthen its presence in the Arctic. View